Year 4 Home Learning W/C July 6th

Hi,

I hope you are all well and are looking forward to some relaxation in the social distancing rules.

I hope you enjoyed the class Zoom meeting. I have arranged another one for this week.

Don’t forget, that if you find some of the work a little tricky or too easy, then you can always have a go at the work on another class page that is more appropriate for you.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

There is now a new way of accessing Twinkl materials. If I have included any you will need to type in a pin number in order to gain access to any materials that have been posted. I will post the number if required.

PE

I see that Joe Wicks  is only putting out video content a couple of times a week. That’s not a problem, as you can revisit any of the older sessions on his webpage.

Reading

Hopefully, you have had a chance to access Cornerstones. There is so much good material on there if you have run out of books. Pick the one that is most appropriate for your reading level.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at commonly misspelt words from the Year 4.

  1. straight
  2. possession
  3. mention
  4. guide
  5. eight
  6. calendar
  7. special
  8. medicine
  9. guard
  10. earth

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Identify angles

Lesson 2 – Compare and order angles

Lesson 3 – Triangles

Lesson 4 – Quadrilaterals

Times tables

The times tables sheets are for 3 weeks. Just complete the first one.

The answers for the White Rose maths are too large to upload so are shown as screen grabs at the bottom of this page.

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. Back to talk4writing this week.

Topic

How did you get on with your research on the pharaohs? This week, I’d like you to describe early burials in Ancient Egypt. Explain why mummification was developed to preserve bodies for the afterlife; describe the mummification process; make a model of a mummy; understand the importance of The Book of the Dead.

You will:

  • Describe early burials in Ancient Egypt.
  • Explain why mummification developed to preserve bodies for the afterlife.
  • Describe the mummification process.
  • Make a model of a mummy.
  • Understand the importance of The Book of the Dead.

The early burials of the dead found in Egypt (pre-Dynastic) were of the body buried in small pits at the edge of the desert in a curled up (called foetal – like a baby in the uterus) position on their left side, with some goods, e.g. food in bowls, for the afterlife – (Ancient Egyptian type of heaven).

The bodies were preserved naturally because of the drying effect of the sand. Gradually over the years, they began to bury the bodies in clay or wooden coffins to protect them from desert wildlife. However, they then realised that the bodies decayed because they were not in contact with the hot, dry sand, so a process of mummification was developed to preserve the bodies for the afterlife. Mummification developed over the centuries – look at the online mummy timeline, until it was quite an elaborate & long-drawn out process. Watch the process of mummification here, & look inside a mummy online. Eventually many of the internal organs which were more liable to decay were removed & put into canopic jars (session resources): Imnesty (human head) looked after the liver, Hapy (baboon) – lungs, Duamuteh (jackel) – stomach, & Qebehsenuef (falcon) – the intestines, to be buried alongside the body. Later the organs were dehydrated & replaced into the body.

The early pits are thought to have been covered with a mound of sand (roughly the shape of a pyramid) because the Egyptians believed that Life was first created on a Primeval Mound that emerged out of the waters of chaos. Then richer & more important people began to be buried in timber or brick-lined tombs with one or two ‘rooms’, & more elaborate goods were included. By the time of the first Dynasties mud-brick tombs called mastabas (looking like benches that stand outside a traditional Egyptian home today from word meaning bench in Arabic) were built for pharaohs & other high status officials.

These continued to be built for officials even after pyramids were built for pharaohs. The sides are shaped like trapeziums. Two chambers were built in the ground, one for the body & one for the ‘grave goods’ for the afterlife. A chapel for offerings was built into the side. The Ancient Egyptians believed that the dead travelled to the afterlife after passing through the underworld. To help them get through the dangerous underworld, they used spells from The Book of the Dead written on tomb walls or on rolled up papyrus scrolls placed in the tombs . Watch the short video of The Afterlife in Egypt. The ceremonies of ‘opening the mouth’ & ‘weighing the heart’ are described.

Try one of these

  • Make online jigsaws of images from The Book of the Dead. Sort the mummification process into the right order.
  • Take the online challenge to pass through the Underworld.
  • Prepare a mummy online – there are various websites available for this.
  • Make a model of a mummy using clay or Plasticine to create a ‘body’ & then wrap it in Plaster of Paris or Modroc. Once the mummy is dry it can be carefully painted.

Weblinks

Early burials leading to mummification from ancientegypt.co.uk
The afterlife explained from bbc.co.uk
Mummy timeline from ancientegypt.co.uk
Process of mummification explained from ancientegypt.co.uk
Visit the tomb of a noble from metmuseum.org
Short video clip of tomb of an architect from bbc.co.uk
Take the challenge to pass through the Underworld from ancientggypt.co.uk
Mummy making activity from childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk
Mummy making activity from oi-archive.uchicago.edu
Inside a mummy from akhet.co.uk

Science

Following on from last week, I would like you to

  • Notice the tiny details that will help scientists to further classify living things and to record these details in a careful drawing of insects.

Activities

  1. Understand that it is the tiny details that will help scientists further classify living things.
  2. Complete your independent drawing.
  3. Test your knowledge of the classification of living things by playing a game.

Look again at the Levon Biss photographs (see Weblink). When something very small is shown in a very large image you can see so much of the tiny details and features that you wouldn’t usually get to see. To classify living things, scientists must look further than the obvious details to identify which species they are looking at – or if indeed it is a ‘never seen before’ species. Watch the clip on the Levon Biss website again. With this sort of technology available now, so much more can be discovered about tiny species of living things. Levon takes lots of very close-up photos and pieces them back together. Take another look at  some of your drawings from the previous session. Hopefully, these are big, but not enormous! I would like you to make some enormous drawings of tiny invertebrates, to show as many details as possible.

Remember that Levon Biss took hundreds of photos of tiny areas of the insects and slotted them back together. When you are looking at something so small, it’s sometimes easier to break it up into smaller parts. This is what scientists will do when trying to classify a living thing, they will look at all the tiny details as well as the more obvious things – and that is why we can name so many different types of beetle, rather than just one. For the most noticeable things (number of legs, antennae, etc.) beetles are all the same, it’s only when you look really closely that you notice more differences.

Vocabulary
Observation, classify, detail

Weblinks
Levon Biss website from http://microsculpture.net/
Classification game from www.bbc.co.uk
Classification game from http://sciencenetlinks.com

Art

Art ties in nicely with your science work.

Computing

If you can, take a  look at Scratch

Explore some of the tasks to familiarise yourself with how to use the programming software.

Remember, if you want to send any of your work through to Mr Weaver or me, we would really like to see it.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton:)

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Yr 4 Zoom Meeting July 8th 11:30am

Hi,

After the popularity of last week’s meeting we will be having another one as detailed below. Some of your friends may not be watching the school website so, if you get a chance, let them know about it.

Mr Chiverton is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Mr Chiverton’s Zoom Meeting
Time: Jul 8, 2020 11:30 AM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/3707639400?pwd=MlcxZG94WlRNOFd5bWREZ00xTDdzUT09

Meeting ID: 370 763 9400
Password: 2wghku

Dear Parent/Carer,

As we sent out written reports to you at Easter, and the majority of the children have not been in school since, we will not be sending out written reports at the end of the year.

Instead we would like to offer you a ten minute phone call with your child’s teacher. You will be given either a morning or afternoon slot for your call. Please see schedule below.

If you do not wish to receive a phone call please let the school know as soon as possible and we will take you off the list.  The teacher will call the mobile telephone number registered to the first contact on your child’s file. If you would prefer us to call a different person or number please let us know as soon as possible.

Mr Weaver – Friday 10th July

If your child’s surname begins with A-J you will receive a morning call.

If your child’s surname begins with K – W you will receive an afternoon call.

Thanks

Guy Verling

Yr 4 Zoom Meeting July 1st 11:30 am

Chris Chiverton is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

As the children haven’t seen their friends for  a while, I thought it might be nice to have a catch up via Zoom.

Topic: Mr Chiverton’s Year 4 Zoom Meeting
Time: Jul 1, 2020 11:30 AM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/3707639400?pwd=MlcxZG94WlRNOFd5bWREZ00xTDdzUT09

Meeting ID: 370 763 9400
Password: 2wghku

To help it run more smoothly I recommend the following:

  • Download Zoom before the session. This will ensure you have this loaded before the session starts as this may take you 5-10 minutes to download.
  • Wear headphones to ensure the sound quality is not affected.
  • Close down other applications so they don’t impact on transmission speed.
  • When you join the session, please ensure your webcam is on (by clicking on Start Video) and also put yourself on Mute to limit any background noise (By clicking on Mute/Microphone) You will be able to unblock mute when you want to chat.

Year 4 Home Learning W/C June 29th

Hi,

What a difference in the weather this last week. I hope you have been able to enjoy it and haven’t been suffering from hay-fever.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

There is now a new way of accessing Twinkl materials. You will need to type in a pin number in order to gain access to any materials that have been posted.

PE

I see that Joe Wicks  is only putting out video content a couple of times a week. That’s not a problem, as you can revisit any of the older sessions on his webpage.

Reading

I hope you have had a chance to access Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials. Perhaps you could review something that you have read recently. You could also look at  Twinkl. You’ll find that they are often topical and will be differentiated. Pick the one that is most appropriate for your reading level.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words ending in the suffix -ion.

  1. confession
  2. expression
  3. discussion
  4. admission
  5. permission
  6. submission
  7. session
  8. emission
  9. agression
  10. compression

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Interpret charts 2020

Lesson 2 – Comparison sum and difference

Lesson 3 – Introducing line graphs

Lesson 4 – Line graphs

Times tables

The times tables sheets are for 3 weeks. Just complete the second one.

The answers for the White Rose maths are too large to upload so are shown as screen grabs at the bottom of this page.

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. I thought it might be nice to give you the chance to write a story about a picture.

Question time!

What do you think caused this event to happen?

None of the houses appear broken or damaged. What does this suggest to you?

Are there still people inside the houses?

If you were Jake, how would you manage to save them?

How is it that the lights are still on?

Sentence challenge!

Adverbials

An adverbial phrase gives more detail about the verb.

Can you re-write the sentence below so that it begins with the adverbial?

He felt relieved after he had found his house.

Can you use fronted adverbials in your writing today?

Story starter!

He had only been away for a short time.

Upon returning to his home-town, Jake found that it was no longer there: something terrible had happened. After eventually locating his house (it had moved several miles from its previous location) Jake stood on top of it and surveyed the calamitous scene around him. What could have caused such a thing to happen?

Can you continue the story? You could write a flashback, describing what happened to the town, or write about how Jake tries to solve the mystery.

Perfect picture!

Think about what might have caused the houses to be piled up like this. Draw/describe how it happened.

Topic

This week I would like you to take a look at the pharaohs. This could include listing some well-known pharaohs. Research and record facts about an individual pharaoh to make a fact file.

  • Study and compare the lives of some of the well-known pharaohs.
  • Research a well-known pharaoh. Write fact file/biography of a well-known pharaoh.

Can you name any well-known pharaohs. I’m guessing you know Tutankhamun. Tutankhamun was a member of the 18th Dynasty during the New Kingdom period. We know he was born about 1343BCE & died about 1322BCE at 18 years old, but no-one is absolutely certain who his parents were. Current thought is that he was the son of Akhenaten and Kiya, one of Akhenaten’s lesser wives. It is certain that Tutankhamun’s wife was a daughter of Akhenaten & Nefertiti called Ankhesenpaaten (later Anhkesenamun) – so his half-sister. They had two daughters whose mummies were found in the Treasury room of Tutankhamun’s tomb, & so he had no heir when he died. Have a look at a plan of Tutankhamun’s tomb & find the Treasury room.

Pharaohs and tomb information

Although the contents of his tomb told Egyptologists a lot about Ancient Egypt at that time, they didn’t give many details about the man himself.

Have a look at some other well-known pharaohs. Did you notice that not all the pharaohs were men?

Not much is known about many Ancient Egyptian pharaohs, but that some are well-known because there are surviving texts, paintings and statues relating to them. The dates of their reigns are often approximate, as some ancient texts give different figures. Also many pharaohs were known by more than one name which adds to the confusion.

I would like you to do further research about one of the well-known pharaohs, excluding Ramesses the Great (II),Thutmose III, Ramesses III & Zoser/Djoser. You should find out if possible, when the pharaoh was born, the (approximate) dates of their reign, which dynasty they were part of, their main wife (queen) & the relationship with that wife (e.g. siblings), significant lesser wives, where their capital city was, any major monuments that they had built, any major texts that refer to the pharaoh, etc. You could also download some pictures of the pharaoh – statues or wall paintings, noting any symbols of power that are shown. Try creating a fact file or write a short biography  of the pharaoh.

Weblinks

Science

This week, I would like you to consider how scientists are able to classify living things by closely observing them.

Activities

  1. Use a branching database/dichotomous classification key.
  2. Look at the photographs by artist Levon Biss.
  3. Discuss the photographs and consider whether or not they like them and why.
  4. Make careful and accurate observational drawings of an invertebrate found in the local environment.
  5. Make a larger scale drawing of the insect to show the details more clearly.

Look at the first slide of the PowerPoint. Choose a fruit and then create a branching database. Continue with the PowerPoint, and look carefully at the drawings. Slides 2 and 3 – do you think scientific sketches can be considered art? Would you want one of these pictures on your bedroom wall? Why? Click on the link on slide 5 and watch the 5-minute clip about Levon Biss. Why do you think he chose to make his photos of insects so large? Do you like the photos? Why? Look at the different photographs of the beetles. Although they are all beetles, they can look very, very different. You will be creating larger scale observational drawings of some common British insects. Take care as you scale-up their image. Do each step slowly, and remember to make faint lines with your pencils.

Investigation – classifying and identifying
Make close observational drawings and large-scale drawings. Understand that tiny details of features help with classification.

Vocabulary
Observation, details, identify, classify, invertebrate

Weblinks
Levon Bliss site, watch the film (play in bottom left) from http://microsculpture.net/

Art

Art ties in nicely with your science work.

Computing

If you can, take a  look at Scratch

Explore some of the tasks to familiarise yourself with how to use the programming software.

Remember, if you want to send any of your work through to Mr Weaver or me, we would really like to see it.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton:)

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 4 Home Learning W/C June 22nd

Hi,

Hopefully, you have all been able to access the week’s home learning and like the range of tasks provided.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

I hope you are enjoying, and keeping up with your daily Joe Wicks.

Reading

An excellent resource for reading has been provided by Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at the c sound spelt -due and the g sound spelt -gue

  1. unique
  2. antique
  3. grotesque
  4. cheque
  5. picturesque
  6. fatigue
  7. league
  8. dialogue
  9. catalogue
  10. tongue

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1 -Too big to upload as a file

Lesson 2 – Ordering money

Lesson 3 – Estimating money

Lesson 4 – Four operations

Year 4 Tables Tests

The answers for the White Rose maths are too large to upload, so are shown as screen grabs at the bottom of this page.

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing, but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science: Living things and their Habitat

Become an expert on how living things are classified.

Activities

  1. Understand why it is useful to classify living things.
  2. Answer questions about the features of insects, arachnids and plants found in the local area.
  3. Create a branching database/dichotomous key to sort and identify local invertebrates.
  4. Understand why it is important to make accurate observations when describing features of living things.

We need to name living things to make discussion easier. Watch the BBC clip about classification – stop it at 6m20 and think about the classification of dolphins. Play the final part of the BBC clip. Careful observations of living things are needed so that scientists know which group they belong to.

Collect some leaves or look at the Woodland Trust ID sheet. What do you think the best method would be to group the leaves. You could use a branching database. How about creating a branching database for the insects and spiders you observed in the previous session.

Download the Woodlands Trust minibeast sheet. You need to create a branching database to identify all of the species. Spend time looking at the minibeasts and consider what they look like – what features do/don’t they have? Wings, legs, antennae? What sorts of questions might you have, e.g. Has it got a shell? Has it got wings? Has it got 6 legs? Has it got more than 8 legs? Is it segmented? Does it have antennae? Is it black/brown/red? Remember the questions must always have a yes/no answer. The yes and no then leads to either another question or an insect. There will be one less question than the number of insects. Try to use either pen & paper & images/photos/drawings of the insects you found to create your own key.

New species are still being discovered, especially in more remote places like the deepest parts of the oceans or in thick rainforest. Recent finds include a new jellyfish off Italian coast, a new type of praying mantis (insect) in Rwanda and some new dancing frogs in India. Use a search engine to find more recent discoveries! When scientists find a species they try to classify it by observing some of its features – does it live on land? Does it lay eggs? Is its skin wet or dry.

Investigation – sorting, classifying and identifying
Create a branching database to sort and identify local invertebrates.

Vocabulary
Classify, sort, group, similar, different, branching database, identify, variety, question, explore, ke

Weblinks
Explains different animal classes from www.kidzone.ws
Clip about classification of living things from www.bbc.co.uk
Minibeast id from www.woodlandtrust.org.uk
Leaf identification PDF from www.woodlandtrust.org.uk
Software programme that creates branching data from www.flexible.co.uk
New species of jellyfish from http://news.nationalgeographic.com
New species of mantis from www.eurekalert.org
New species of frog from www.theguardian.com

Topic: Egyptians

Art

The Ancient Egyptians were around for thousands of years. So much is still to be found out about their lives. What can you find out? There’s lots of information on the internet on this subject. Maybe you could use it to complete some of the exercises.

Investigate the main sections of a typical Ancient Egyptian temple; learn some of the duties carried out by priests and priestesses and make a model temple.

  • Describe the main sections of a typical Ancient Egyptian temple.
  • List some of the duties carried out by priests and priestesses.
  • Make a model temple.

Temples were found everywhere in Ancient Egypt, their purpose being to communicate with the gods. Each temple was dedicated to a particular god or goddess. Some family gods like Bes (god of families & children, who was a dwarf who made the other gods laugh) & Tawaret (god of pregnant women & babies, who looked like a female hippopotamus) were worshipped at home. There were two parts to the temple: the inner temple where only the Pharaoh (the highest priest) & other important priests were allowed & the outer temple where lower priests were allowed. There would also be libraries, school rooms & places for the priests to live. The Egyptians believed the gods actually lived inside the temples & so ordinary people were never allowed in except on festival days – any offerings or messages they had were given to the priests to take inside. The Pharaohs also gave offerings to the gods. It was the priests’ jobs to make sure the gods were well cared for & kept happy – they washed & clothed the gods & said prayers & burned incense for the gods. Priests also taught the sons of the more wealthy & nobles to read & write (& to become scribes). The ordinary people could buy (barter for) food at stalls outside the temples, to give as offerings to the gods. The priests also distributed beer (the Ancient Egyptian form of beer was the most common drink for everyone including chn) & cakes to the poor. Women were also involved as priestesses & they contributed by singing, playing musical instruments & dancing (see next session). Some temples were homes to holy animals (living images of some of gods), so contained many mummified animals, e.g. cats (Bast).

Look at pictures of temples: outside & inside on the websites & identify the main areas of a typical temple: pylon (gate)/courtyard/hypostyle hall/the second hall/sanctuary/sacred lake. Note the tall, pointed obelisks often built in front of the pylons. In particular look together at British Museum site. There are ruins of many temples in Egypt for archaeologists to study, with plenty of hieroglyphic inscriptions.

The temple might also contain smaller rooms for visiting priests; dressing rooms; store rooms; how some even might have kitchens for preparing food; workshops for repairing/making the statues of the gods, clothing, jewellery, etc. There was even a room for making the daily sacrifices.

Activity

After research using websites/books,  produce a plan of a temple showing the main areas as well as additional rooms (secret or otherwise). Add labels/explanations for each part.

Try to build a simple temple. You could use an old shoebox or lego as the starting point. Create it as a building, not as a ruin, but with a removable roof so that the interior structure can be seen. Decorate your temples with bright paintings of the gods, Pharaoh & with hieroglyphs and with the ceiling painted to look like the night sky.

Weblinks

Mr Weaver and I would love to see some of your work. If you get a chance to send it through to us, please let us know if it’s okay to put it on the school website.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton 🙂

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

End of Year Maths Expectations

Year 4 Maths Expectations

Mathematics-Non-Negotiables-Year-4

Attached above are the end of year Maths Expectations for Year 4. They are the minimum expectations that all pupils must attain by the end of Year 4, in order to be ‘At the expected standard’ in Maths.

The content identifies basics to ensure children make rapid progress and access learning in other areas, as well as securing success in terms of preparing children for the next stages in their learning.

I have attached this document for your information as a lot of learning has taken place at home over recent months so you can use this document to track and assess where your child is at and any gaps that they may have. It is purely so you can see what your child is expected to achieve in maths by the end of the academic year and gives examples of how they could do this. It also helps to prepare them for their new year group in September.

Your child’s new teacher in September will be sharing the appropriate document for their new year group with you at our Autumn term parents evening. Alongside our termly NTS assessments, teachers will also be using these documents to assess and track children’s progress throughout the year.

Written with age appropriate expectations in mind, they:

  • focus on the basics; making a difference to progress for all children
  • support teachers in recognising key areas to promote progress
  • are based on the average pupil in the cohort, supporting the need for differentiation.

These expectations are in no way intended to cover the entirety of the curriculum – they are an on-going reminder of key objectives for the year group. They are the basics in order to embed and support meaningful learning.

Thank you! Mrs Owen

Home Learning update

Hi,

It seems that Twinkl are not permitting as much free access to their website as they were before. As a result of this, some of the home learning tasks have been tweaked so that they don’t rely on access to Twinkl materials.

Keep up the good work, and feel free to send any of it to your class teacher or me.

Mr Chiverton

Year 4 Home Learning W/C June 15th

Hi,

Hopefully, you have all been able to access the week’s home learning and like the range of tasks provided.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

I hope you are enjoying, and keeping up with your daily Joe Wicks.

Reading

An excellent resource for reading has been provided by Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words where we add il- and revising un-, in-, mis-, dis-

  1. unclear
  2. illegal
  3. illogical
  4. dislike
  5. incomplete
  6. impossible
  7. mistake
  8. mishap
  9. instead
  10. instant

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Write decimals 2020

Lesson 2 – Compare decimals 2020

Lesson 3 – Order decimals 2020

Lesson 4 – Round decimals 2020

Ultimate timetables

The answers for the White Rose maths are too large to upload, so are shown as screen grabs at the bottom of this page.

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing, but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science: Living things and their Habitat

Become an expert in the 7 characteristics of a living thing. Take a trip within the local environment, observe habitats and record the different living things you find.

Activities

  1. Ask questions about local habitats and consider how to answer them.
  2. Take a trip within their local environment (the school grounds or further if possible).
  3. Carefully observe the micro-habitats they can see around them.
  4. Record different living things they can see (animals and plants).
  5. Gather a small sample of different leaves and photos/notes of different animals.

Investigation – exploring, sorting, classifying and identifying
Observe local habitats and record living things they see around them.

What are the seven life processes that all living things do? Can you remember MRS NERG? Look at your posters as a reminder.

Can you name any habitats in the vicinity of your house? –  write a list on a flipchart. Think of smaller habitats, e.g. garden bed, under the tree, on the playground, the school pond or wild flower area, under a log, in the compost heap.

What questions might you ask about the habitat?

Has this habitat always looked like this?

How does the habitat change during the different seasons?

Come up with questions about the different habitats listed. Write the questions on down and stick them alongside the list generated earlier. Can anyone answer the question? Can we offer a sensible/possible answer? What could we do to try to find the answer out?

The aim of the field trip is to collect information about the living things, particularly invertebrates (creatures without a backbone such as insects, worms, etc.) and plants, present within the habitat you have chosen to visit. Record your findings on a display sheet and explain what you are expecting in each box.

Remember to check with an adult first, and be careful what you touch.

Vocabulary
Habitat, living thing, alive, dead, never been alive, plant, animal, insect, local, natural, man-made, observation, record, vertebrate, invertebrate, arachnid, question

Weblinks
Leaf identification PDF from www.woodlandtrust.org.uk
Spotter sheet downloads from www.woodlandtrust.org.uk
Instructions for safe and considerate collection methods for insects (Pg.3) from www.forestryengland.uk
Minibeast identification from www.science-resources.co.uk

Topic: Egyptians

Art

The Ancient Egyptians were around for thousands of years. So much is still to be found out about their lives. What can you find out? There’s lots of information on the internet on this subject. Maybe you could use it to complete some of the exercises.

I initially had a link on here to Twinkl, however their site is limited in what they are offering for free. Try following the links in Art to the various tasks. I would therefore like you to look at the following.

  • Understand that the Ancient Egyptians worshipped many different gods & goddesses.
  • Describe the headdresses of a range of gods and goddesses.
  • Plan and make an Ancient Egyptian headdress.
  • Evaluate their Ancient Egyptian headdress.

Ancient Egyptians worshipped many gods & goddesses, many related to each other. The gods argued & plotted together to make things happen. The people prayed to the gods to make good things happen, e.g. to Hathor as she was the goddess of love, or to stop bad things happening, e.g. they prayed to Bes to ward off evil spirits. Sacrifices would be made to keep the gods happy. People would ask the gods for advice, or to ask them to perform particular tasks such as helping them to defeat their enemies, or making the rain come to water their crops. Look at a range of gods online, e.g. Anubis, Hathor, Bes, Ma’at, Tawaret, Ptah. What do you think the A. Egyptians believed would happen if they did not give sacrifices? The gods would become angry & upset & cause bad things to happen or would not stop bad things happening. Many of the gods & goddesses had particular symbols that they wore or held which made them easy to identify in pictures or they had an animal form, e.g. Amun – ram, Re – falcon, Hathor – cow, Anubis – falcon. Many carried an ankh symbol (key of life – session resources). Only during the reign of Akhenaten & Nefertiti did the worship of many gods change. Akhenaten thought the people should worship a single god – Aten (or sun-disk), which must have shocked the Ancient Egyptians. After his death the people gradually returned to worshipping many gods (Tutankhamun led this change when he became Pharaoh). Look at pictures of the types of headdresses worn by the gods online. Whilst the bodies of the gods were all very similar in shape & clothing, the painters & sculptors gave much attention to the head!  It was the pharaohs & priests who gave the painters & sculptors the ideas as they wanted to promote their favourite gods as much as possible & make them stand out from the rest. Headdresses were often adorned with plumes, horns, snakes, flowers, sun discs, leaves, etc. painted in bright colours. Often individual gods would also have specific symbols or signs such as a crown or uraeus as part of their headgear – this was in order to identify them. See websites below for some excellent examples.

Have a go at making your own Egyptian god or goddess headdress – it can be modelled on a real god or totally made up but you need to base their ideas on the fact that the headdresses were very bright, elaborate & often quite large (and if really worn, no doubt quite heavy & difficult to keep steady).

You could: 1) create a card cylinder that can fit over their head, cut to shape & then cover in papier-mâché, 2) paint papier-mâché with powder paints, then paint with watered down PVA glue for strength & a shiny finish (you might need to do some touch-up painting when they have stuck additional things on), 3) stick-on materials if required, including wool, cotton wool, aluminium foil, corrugated card, fabric of various sorts, feathers, coloured straws, etc.

List of important gods & goddesses from ancientegypt.co.uk
List of gods from bbc.co.uk
Headdresses of gods from nemo.nu
Headdress descriptions from landofpyramids.org
British Museum activity to return some symbols back to the correct gods from ancientegypt.co.uk

Mr Weaver and I would love to see some of your work. If you get a chance to send it through to us, please let us know if it’s okay to put it on the school website.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton 🙂

 

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 4 Home Learning W/C June 8th

Hi,

I hope you have all settled into Summer term and have found plenty to do with the change in weather.

A couple of little changes to this week’s plans. Work your way through the various subjects and see how you get on.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

A good way to start the day is with a little Joe Wicks.

Reading

Don’t forget, there are plenty of places to find reading materials online if you are running out of books at home. A really good site, which has celebrities reading chapters, is linked to Harry Potter  

Spellings

See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words where the ending in shun spelt -sion.

  1. confusion
  2. explosion
  3. decision
  4. collision
  5. division
  6. television
  7. erosion
  8. illusion
  9. occasion
  10. invasion

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Tenths as decimals 2019

Lesson 2 – Dividing 2 digits by 10 2019

Lesson 3 – Hundredths as decimals 2019

Lesson 4 – Dividing 1 and 2 digits by a hundred 2019

Ultimate Times Table Daily Practice 15 Booklet

The answers for the White Rose maths are too large to upload, so are shown as screen grabs at the bottom of this page.

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing, but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science: Living things and their Habitat

Become an expert in the 7 characteristics of a living thing. Make a poster and explain life processes to younger children. Sort living things in a variety of ways.

Understand the characteristics of a living thing and to begin to consider that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.

Activities

  1. Understand the 7 characteristics of a living thing.
  2. Explain one of the characteristics in more detail to someone else.
  3. Discuss which living things they would expect to find in their local environment.
  4. Consider which living things they would definitely not find locally and why.
  5. Begin to understand that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.
  6. Ask relevant questions about living things and their habitats.

Investigation – sorting, classifying and idendifying
Ask relevant questions about living things and their habitats and begin to group them.

Vocabulary
Alive, dead, never been alive, movement, reproduction, sensitivity, nutrition, excretion, respiration, growth, habitat, local

Topic: Egyptians

The Ancient Egyptians were around for thousands of years. So much is still to be found out about their lives. What can you find out? There’s lots of information on the internet on this subject. Maybe you could use it to complete some of the exercises.

Modern Egypt Home Learning Task

Pharaoh School Home Learning Task

Ancient Egypt Activity Sheet

Art

Maybe, you could create some art work linked to your Science or Topic work.

Mr Weaver and I would love to see some of your work. If you get a chance to send it through to us, please let us know if it’s okay to put it on the school website.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton 🙂

 

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4