Year 6 Hoodies

Hi,

I understand that some of you have been asking about the Year 6 hoodies. Although they are not compulsory, in the past few years every child has ordered one. In order to sort these we need to size everyone up. We anticipate that we can get this done in the first week back in September and can place the order immediately. In the past the delivery times are quite quick, so I would hope you could have them before you might need to consider buying a school jumper. Prices will be confirmed in September.

Mr Chiverton

Yr 5 Home Learning W/C July 6th

Hi,

I hope you are all well and are looking forward to some relaxation in the social distancing rules.

I hope you enjoyed the class Zoom meeting. I have arranged another one for this week.

Don’t forget, that if you find some of the work a little tricky or too easy, then you can always have a go at the work on another class page that is more appropriate for you.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

There is now a new way of accessing Twinkl materials. If I have included any you will need to type in a pin number in order to gain access to any materials that have been posted. I will post the number if required.

PE

I see that Joe Wicks  is only putting out video content a couple of times a week. That’s not a problem, as you can revisit any of the older sessions on his webpage.

Reading

Hopefully, you have had a chance to access Cornerstones. There is so much good material on there if you have run out of books. Pick the one that is most appropriate for your reading level.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at common words from the Year 5.

  1. accommodate
  2. conscience
  3. existence
  4. muscle
  5. rhythm
  6. accompany
  7. conscious
  8. explanation
  9. necessary
  10. sacrifice

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

As some of the questions require you to measure an angle you could try estimating using this protractor to help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Regular and irregular polygons

Lesson 2 – Reasoning about 3D shapes

Lesson 3 – Reflection

Lesson 4 – Translation

Times Tables

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science

This week, I’d like you to:

  • Make observations, as a natural scientist would, recording data and reporting findings.
  • Learn about some famous naturalists.

Activities

  1. Make observations, record findings and draw conclusions, as natural scientists.
  2. Research and present, in role, information on a significant naturalist.

If you can, o out into the  local woodland or park and get sit and observe nature. You will need to sit comfortably and remain still and quiet. What can you see, what can you hear, and what can you smell? Move slowly as you write so as to not disturb any wildlife. Hopefully over 10-15 minutes birds and mini-beasts should be seen and heard. Not everything you hear will be natural – you may hear and see vehicles on nearby roads, or planes in the sky.

What is a natural scientist?. A natural scientist, or naturalist, studies natural history, i.e. the study of plants and animals by observation rather than by experimentation. An animal behaviourist makes a scientific study of everything an animal does (from amoebae to gorillas!), so again they observe very carefully. You have just ‘been’ natural scientists and in fact have been working as natural scientists over the past few weeks as you have observed the insects and frogs.

Can you name any scientists who are naturalists or animal behaviourists? (Charles Darwin, Chris Packham, David Attenborough, Alfred Russel Wallace, Steve Backshall, Steve Irwin, Jane Goodall, George McGavin, etc.) You may have seen many of these people presenting natural history programmes on the television. What sort of behaviour or processes of animals and plants might be studied? Feeding, sleeping, finding/building shelter, interacting with other members of their species or with other animals, reacting to stimuli, playing, fighting, learning skills, mating or reproducing, excreting, etc. All things to do with being alive, well and happy! Watch David Attenborough presenting one of his natural history programmes. These programmes introduce people who are not scientists to many interesting and wonderful aspects of animal and plant life. People can see things happening or visit places virtually which they are unlikely to see or visit themselves. The programmes take a long time to make – the naturalists and film crew have to be very patient and can spend long hours waiting to capture a particular behaviour on film; they are filmed in often quite extreme conditions or difficult to access places; some of the plants and animals are rare or timid (in the case of animals) or the behaviour only happens at night (so sometimes infra-red cameras are used).

Jane Goodall is an expert on primates, particularly well-known for her work with chimpanzees. Listen to her talking about her life in the links above. She started working with just a notebook and binoculars – observing carefully.

I’d like you to complete your final observations and diary entries for the insects. You need to look at your propagated plants (if you had a chance to complete it), taking measurements and making observations and draw labelled diagrams, graphs, etc., then drawing conclusions on the success of the cuttings. Examine the runners and potatoes as well.

Exploring important natural scientists: Research and make notes on one of the naturalists.

Scientific illustrations exhibition: You can create your own art books that contain your illustrations from the block as well as select your best specimen to be put forward for the school website.

Vocabulary
Natural scientist, naturalist, observation, conservation, endangered

Weblinks
Jane Goodall Org from www.janegoodall.org.uk
Jane Goodall from http://video.nationalgeographic.com

Topic

This week I’d like you to look at questions of cause and significance when drawing the story of a detective case as a cartoon.

You will:

  • Address questions of cause and significance based on historical sources.
  • Improvise the story of a historical criminal case.
  • Write and/or draw a narrative version of an historical event.

You are going to become detectives to try to work out some cases that the earliest police detectives faced. Watch the Police PowerPoint presentation about the development of detective work in the police. Read the first page of instructions on each case first and then look at the evidence and read it and consider what it all means, then try to answer the questions you have been set.

Cases

1) The ghost ended up being a local engineer who was sent to an asylum. 2) Dick Schwick was actually Lois Schwick, a 20 year old woman who needed to support her family. 3) Adelaide Bartlett was acquitted of murdering her husband. 4) The detectives were all found guilty, and that’s when the CID was formed to replace them. 5) Most of the jewels were never found, but William Johnson was convicted of stealing them.

Cartoon template

Newspaper report template

Finally, try creating a narrative of the case either as a story, a report in the style of a newspaper article or in a cartoon.

Art

Art ties in nicely with your topic work.

Computing

If you can, take a  look at Scratch

Explore some of the tasks to familiarise yourself with how to use the programming software.

Remember, if you want to send any of your work through to Mrs Duncan or me, we would really like to see it.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton:)

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

YR 5 Zoom Meeting July 7th 1:30pm

Hi,

After the popularity of last week’s meeting we will be having another one as detailed below. Some of your friends may not be watching the school website so, if you get a chance, let them know about it.

Mr Chiverton is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Chris Chiverton’s Zoom Meeting
Time: Jul 7, 2020 01:30 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/3707639400?pwd=MlcxZG94WlRNOFd5bWREZ00xTDdzUT09

Meeting ID: 370 763 9400
Password: 2wghku

Dear Parent/Carer,

As we sent out written reports to you at Easter, and the majority of the children have not been in school since, we will not be sending out written reports at the end of the year.

Instead we would like to offer you a ten minute phone call with your child’s teacher. You will be given either a morning or afternoon slot for your call. Please see schedule below.

If you do not wish to receive a phone call please let the school know as soon as possible and we will take you off the list.  The teacher will call the mobile telephone number registered to the first contact on your child’s file. If you would prefer us to call a different person or number please let us know as soon as possible.

Mrs Duncan – Tuesday 14th July

If your child’s surname begins with A-K you will receive a morning call.

If your child’s surname begins with L – W you will receive an afternoon call.

Thanks

Guy Verling

Y5 Zoom meeting June 30th 13:30

Chris Chiverton is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

As the children haven’t seen their friends for  a while, I thought it might be nice to have a catch up via Zoom.

Topic: Chris Chiverton’s Zoom Meeting
Time: Jun 30, 2020 01:30 PM London

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/3707639400?pwd=MlcxZG94WlRNOFd5bWREZ00xTDdzUT09

Meeting ID: 370 763 9400
Password: 2wghku

To help it run more smoothly I recommend the following:

  • Download Zoom before the session. This will ensure you have this loaded before the session starts as this may take you 5-10 minutes to download.
  • Wear headphones to ensure the sound quality is not affected.
  • Close down other applications so they don’t impact on transmission speed.
  • When you join the session, please ensure your webcam is on (by clicking on Start Video) and also put yourself on Mute to limit any background noise (By clicking on Mute/Microphone) You will be able to unblock mute when you want to chat.

Yr 5 Home Learning W/C June 29th

Hi,

What a difference in the weather this last week. I hope you have been able to enjoy it and haven’t been suffering from hay-fever.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

There is now a new way of accessing Twinkl materials. You will need to type in a pin number in order to gain access to any materials that have been posted.

PE

I see that Joe Wicks  is only putting out video content a couple of times a week. That’s not a problem, as you can revisit any of the older sessions on his webpage.

Reading

I hope you have had a chance to access Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials. Perhaps you could review something that you have read recently. You could also look at  Twinkl. You’ll find that they are often topical and will be differentiated. Pick the one that is most appropriate for your reading level.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words ending in the suffix -shul spelt -cial or -tial

  1. presidential
  2. official
  3. confidential
  4. initial
  5. essential
  6. partial
  7. special
  8. official
  9. artificial
  10. financial

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Some of the work this week requires a protractor. I understand that most of you won’t have one, but if you could print one off the internet and use it to estimate your angles.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Measuring with a protractor (2)

Lesson 2 – Drawing lines and angles accurately

Lesson 3 – Calculating angles on a straight line

Lesson 4 – Calculating angles around a point

Times Tables

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science

This week, I’d like you to:

  • Research the life cycles of a contrasting bird, insect, amphibian and plant.
  • Record life cycles in the form of annotated scientific illustrations.

Activities

  1. Research the life cycles of an insect, amphibian, mammal, bird and plant that contrasts with those already studied.
  2. Create a series of annotated scientific illustrations that reflect the life cycles of the animals and plants they have researched.
  3. Use all skills developed so far for sketching and developing colour and texture using watercolour pencils.

Investigation – analysing secondary sources/pattern seeking
Compare the lifecycles of mammals, amphibians, insects and birds (pattern seeking).
Research reproduction in plants and animals.

We are going to do some travelling! Try to find some interesting and quirky animals and plants from around the world and explore their life cycles online. We are going to research a range of life cycles, from around the world. Do mammals lay eggs? Not in general, except for two unusual species: duck-billed platypus and the spiny anteater.They are called monotremes and are found in Australia and New Guinea.

Another type of mammal called a marsupial, e.g. kangaroo, wallaby and koala bear are found mostly in Australasia and the Americas and they have a slightly different life cycle as well – they give birth to poorly developed babies who after birth crawl into a pouch in which they can suckle on the mammary glands to grow and develop further. Have a look at the kangaroo life cycle diagram and note that the baby kangaroo (called a joey) weighs less than 2g when it is born and is about 2 cm long. It is blind and hairless. It crawls through the mother’s fur and into the pouch where it starts suckling on one of the mammary glands. After about 6 months it starts to climb out of the pouch to spend some time exercising and eating. At about 8 months it leaves the pouch.

These are examples of different life cycles to the ‘classic’ mammalian life cycle and make for an interesting contrast to the native mammal that you researched in the last session. How might you create a scientific illustration for any of these more unusual mammals – what sort of sketches might you include to show how these life cycles differ. Think about the kind of information you will need to find out for your illustration.

Try to create a total of six illustrations. Talk to an adult about what you have found and check the language you are using.

Vocabulary
Life cycle, mammal, bird, amphibian, insect, reproduction

Weblinks
DK Find out from www.dkfindout.com
All living things from www.bbc.co.uk

Topic

This week I’d like you to find out what a police officer does and make drawings of police officers at work.

You will:

  • Find out what a police officer does today as a prelude to doing historical research.
  • Write a job description.
  • Draw an image of a person doing a task.

If we were at school I would have asked for a police officer to come in for a chat. As we can’t have that, then I’d like you to watch the YouTube video from 4.10 and do the fitness test at the same time as the police recruits. You have to run from one end of the room to the other by the time the beep sounds – if you’re too quick or too slow, you’re out. The beeps get closer together every few goes!

Have a look at the Police PowerPoint to recap on some of the things that a police officer has to do today. You are going to write a job description for a police officer. Job descriptions are written to try to show people who want that job what it would be like.

Have a look at the Police Officer Job Description and the sections like headings, sub-headings and bullet points. Think about the different sections of the job description and what you want to add.

Once completed you can add a picture of a police officer doing something to the job description you have written in the box on the template using the drawing materials you have provided.

Weblinks

The fitness test for becoming a police officer -YouTube clip
Job description of a police officer from targetjobs.co.uk
Answers from police officers about their job in Norfolk from norfolk.police.uk

Art

Art ties in nicely with your science work.

Computing

If you can, take a  look at Scratch

Explore some of the tasks to familiarise yourself with how to use the programming software.

Remember, if you want to send any of your work through to Mrs Duncan or me, we would really like to see it.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton:)

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 5 Home Learning W/C June 22nd

Hi,

Hopefully, you have all been able to access the week’s home learning and like the range of tasks provided.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

I hope you are enjoying, and keeping up with your daily Joe Wicks.

Reading

An excellent resource for reading has been provided by Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words ending in shus spelt –tious,one tricky spelling that sounds like it follows the rule and a few common misspelt words.

  1. infectious
  2. cautious
  3. nutritious
  4. ambitious
  5. fictitious
  6. superstitious
  7. anxious
  8. believe
  9. because
  10. separate

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Subtracting decimals with the same number of decimal places

Lesson 2 – Subtracting decimals with a different number of decimal places

Lesson 3 – Multiplying decimals by 10 100 and 1000

Lesson 4 – Dividing decimals by 10 100 and 1000

Times Tables – With the ultimate times tables sheet I would like you to time yourself and see how many you complete correctly in 5 minutes. Next week, complete the same test and see if you can beat your score.

The answers are are a little too large to upload, so I’ve put them at the bottom of this page. No peaking!

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Topic

This week we are going to look at the courts. I would ideally like to have set this up in class.

In a court you have to swear to tell the truth. What do you think a court of law is? If you laugh you could be threatened in a semi-serious manner with ‘contempt of court’.

I would like you to research the following:

What is the  job of the judge?

What is usually decided in a court of law?

What are people like you who give evidence called?

Who else would you find in a court of law?

Who often helps the judge make a decision about whether someone is guilty?

What happens to people if they are found guilty?

How long have we had courts of law?

Have they always worked in the same way?

These last questions will be hard to answer, so this is a good time to become investigators to report back after doing some research.

Look at the second question and see if you can break it down into smaller questions, as it covers a lot of information, e.g. Have courts of law always had juries? Have courts of law always been run by one judge? Have you always had to swear an oath to tell the truth if you are a witness? Have fines and prison been the main types of punishment? 

In the weblink are some sites that might help you. I’ve also included a Brief history of courts  for you to look at.

Weblinks

A short history of the judiciary from judiciary.gov.uk
Anglo-Saxon law from bbc.co.uk
Medieval law from bbc.co.uk
A shorter read about medieval law from historylearningsite.co.uk

Science/Art

You might need to have a chat with a grown up in your house before you consider the science for this week. We would normally be teaching this at this point in the year and it is appropriate for the age group.

Match the offspring names to the mammalian adults Mammals and their young.

We first need to consider what a mammal? – It is an animal that has mammary glands, which in the female develop and produce milk for feeding the young. Mammals are warm-blooded and normally have hair (fur) on their bodies. They have live births (not eggs, in general – exceptions will be explored in another session). Mammals have a fairly simple life cycle and reproduce using sexual reproduction – once male (sperm) and female (egg) gametes come together through internal fertilisation, a foetus forms which remains in the mother’s uterus for a gestation period (this varies from less than a month for a mouse to almost 2 years for an elephant). Watch the human reproduction video then note that young are born live and look like the adult, just smaller and less developed. The young then develop and grow into adults. Compare the mammalian life cycles to the more complex life cycles that you explored in the previous session. Watch a horse giving birth in the BBC clip and highlight how the foal gets onto its feet within minutes – does this happen with human babies? Now watch the BBC reproduction video and identify the most obvious difference between birds and the large majority of mammals. Birds lay eggs! Look at the BBC bird clip then look at the egg diagram and notice that if the egg has been fertilised before it was laid (internal fertilisation) the germinal disc gradually grows into the chick using the nutrients stored in the yolk. The white protects the egg and the cords hold the yolk in place. The air cell/sac allows the bird to breathe just before it breaks out of its shell. There are tiny pores in the egg shell which allow air to enter.

Consider the life cycle of a swallow. They breed in the northern hemisphere (including Britain) and fly south in winter to South Africa crossing the dangerous Sahara, then return to their breeding grounds the following spring. Other birds might migrate only within Britain, e.g. thrushes from Scotland migrating down to southern England. Migration is usually driven by the non-availability of food, which is often the result of climate & habitat changes during different seasons. Birds usually migrate in flocks. We will be exploring zoological illustration of native mammals and birds during this session.

Activities

  1. Identify a local mammal and bird species and research their life cycles online.
  2. Draw and annotate a life cycle zoological illustration for both mammal and bird lifecycles.
  3. Use watercolour pencils to create texture and colour in their drawing.

Draw the life cycle of a ‘local’ or native mammal (see list). You will need to complete online research to help. Make sure you use reliable sources of information and how to check details by cross-referencing. Think about how to create feather and fur textures with your watercolour pencils.

Investigation – analysing secondary sources
Research and sketch mammalian and bird life cycles for comparison.

Vocabulary
Mammal, bird, sexual reproduction, life cycle, gestation, foetus, sperm, egg, uterus, chick, egg, baby, adult

Activities

  1. Identify a local mammal and bird species and research their life cycles online.
  2. Draw and annotate a life cycle zoological illustration for both mammal and bird lifecycles.
  3. Use watercolour pencils to create texture and colour in their drawing.

Investigation – analysing secondary sources
Research and sketch mammalian and bird life cycles for comparison.

Vocabulary
Mammal, bird, sexual reproduction, life cycle, gestation, foetus, sperm, egg, uterus, chick, egg, baby, adult

Weblinks
Horse giving birth from www.bbc.co.uk
Human reproduction from www.bbc.co.uk
Reproduction (from 3min 16) from www.bbc.co.uk
Life of birds – egg laying from www.bbc.co.uk
Chicks hatched and raised online from www.relaxedfarming.co.uk

I hope you have a good week.

Mr Chiverton

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

 

End of Year Maths Expectations

Year 5 Maths Expectations

Mathematics-Non-Negotiables-Year-5

Attached above are the end of year Maths Expectations for Year 5. They are the minimum expectations that all pupils must attain by the end of Year 5, in order to be ‘At the expected standard’ in Maths.

The content identifies basics to ensure children make rapid progress and access learning in other areas, as well as securing success in terms of preparing children for the next stages in their learning.

I have attached this document for your information as a lot of learning has taken place at home over recent months so you can use this document to track and assess where your child is at and any gaps that they may have. It is purely so you can see what your child is expected to achieve in maths by the end of the academic year and gives examples of how they could do this. It also helps to prepare them for their new year group in September.

Your child’s new teacher in September will be sharing the appropriate document for their new year group with you at our Autumn term parents evening. Alongside our termly NTS assessments, teachers will also be using these documents to assess and track children’s progress throughout the year.

Written with age appropriate expectations in mind, they:

  • focus on the basics; making a difference to progress for all children
  • support teachers in recognising key areas to promote progress
  • are based on the average pupil in the cohort, supporting the need for differentiation.

These expectations are in no way intended to cover the entirety of the curriculum – they are an on-going reminder of key objectives for the year group. They are the basics in order to embed and support meaningful learning.

Thank you! Mrs Owen

Home Learning update

Hi,

It seems that Twinkl are not permitting as much free access to their website as they were before. As a result of this, some of the home learning tasks have been tweaked so that they don’t rely on access to Twinkl materials.

Keep up the good work, and feel free to send any of it to your class teacher or me.

Mr Chiverton