Yr 6 Home Learning W/C July 6th

Hi,

I hope you are all well and are looking forward to some relaxation in the social distancing rules.

I hope you enjoyed the class Zoom meeting. I have arranged another one for this week.

Don’t forget, that if you find some of the work a little tricky or too easy, then you can always have a go at the work on another class page that is more appropriate for you.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

There is now a new way of accessing Twinkl materials. If I have included any you will need to type in a pin number in order to gain access to any materials that have been posted. I will post the number if required.

PE

I see that Joe Wicks  is only putting out video content a couple of times a week. That’s not a problem, as you can revisit any of the older sessions on his webpage.

Reading

Hopefully, you have had a chance to access Cornerstones. There is so much good material on there if you have run out of books. Pick the one that is most appropriate for your reading level.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at common words from the Year 6.

  1. accomodate
  2. conscience
  3. existence
  4. muscle
  5. rhythm
  6. accompany
  7. conscious
  8. explanation
  9. necessary
  10. sacrifice

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

As some of the questions require you to measure an angle you could try estimating using this protractor to help.

Video link

Lesson 1 – Vertically opposite angles

Lesson 2 – Angles in a triangle – missing angles

Lesson 3 – Angles in special quadrilaterals

Lesson 4 – Angles in regular polygons

A little different for times tables this week. Just remember to count the zeros carefully.

Times tables

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science – A healthy body: Diet, Exercise and Lifestyle

This week, I’d like you to:

  • Identify those aspects of a diet that are healthy and unhealthy and the impact diet can have on the body, using scientific evidence.
  • Examine the amount and types of exercise that keep a child and adult body healthy.
  • Note how lifestyle can impact on the body and identify healthy habits.
  • Use video and online editing tools to create a video installation and a TV advert.
  • Identify exercise and diet as contributing factors of a healthy lifestyle.

Activities

  1. Examine the impact of a heathy or unhealthy diet on the human body.
  2. Examine the impact of exercise and lifestyle choices on the human body.
  3. Create a TV advert that explores the impact of diet, exercise and lifestyle on the body.

What is the impact of ‘food’  on the human body (pros and cons) – go through the nutrition chart and see if there are any surprises. Note sometimes we can be eating foods that are worse for us than we think. Then look at the effects (pros and cons) of sugar, salt, fats and water on the human body and consider what you think is a healthy diet. Talk about processed foods and if possible have a look at some food labels – can you identify all of the ingredients (note chemicals and additives, etc. – look them up!) and note hidden sugar and salt. Now write down how much exercise you think you should be getting a week and what sort of exercise it should be – look at NHS guidance. What do you do each week and where could improvements be made. Look at the lifestyle chart. How do scientists know the long-term impact of diet, exercise and lifestyle – through studies. You will be creating a TV advert exploring healthy and unhealthy lifestyles, offering ‘expert’ advice for others on the eating habits, healthy habits and levels and types of exercise that they should be incorporating into their lifestyle on a weekly basis. Look at some reliable websites to ensure their adverts are accurate.

Using research on diet (see links) and on exercise (see NHS link) develop a TV advert. There are two key aspects to this – the research and content, and the artistic approach to the advert. You will need to identify your key messages first and must back up each claim by referencing where you found the information. Think about your approach to the advert – you might like to hold up myth cards or truth cards for each dietary statement and might demonstrate lifestyle choices (getting enough sleep, leading an active life, cleaning teeth and hands, etc.) and the various types of exercise and the forms you could achieve these in. Watch the linked adverts for ideas (these are animations, but you can use live-action) and to identify the key features (music, spoken word, use of language, use of props and people, setting, etc.). The overall objective of the advert is to highlight a healthy diet and lifestyle message as well as note what can happen to the body when we don’t do these things or eat too much unhealthy food. Hopefully, you will recognise that moderation is key to foods high in sugar – it is important to get the message right and that we must not exercise excessively or restrict foods to lose a lot of weight.

Investigation – fair testing, analysing secondary sources
Documentary on diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle.

Vocabulary
Circulatory system, heart, blood, diet, exercise, lifestyle, health

Weblinks
What should I be eating and drinking? from www.bbc.co.uk
Be Food Smart TV advertisement from www.YouTube.com
Change4Life TV advertisement from www.YouTube.com
Change4life advertsisments from www.YouTube.com
Physical activity guidelines from www.nhs.uk

Topic

This week I’d like you to learn about the ways that plants and animals are adapted to the mountain environment and how they can be protected.

You will:

  • Explain how plants are adapted to a mountain environment.
  • Identify a range of mountain animals that are endangered and explain why.
  • Create a factual PowerPoint presentation about a chosen endangered mountain animal, which includes all the information requested.

Last week we looked at  the impact of humans on mountains – Can you remember how we can limit further damage? (Eco-tourism).  Not only do we need to protect the mountain but also the plants and creatures that live there. Mountain regions/climates provide a perfect habitat for some animals that are now endangered and could become extinct. Mountains are also home to some of our planet’s most popular plant foods (potato, maize, barley, apple, tomato) and have provided food for people and animals living in the mountains for hundreds of years.

How are plants specially adapted to suit a mountain environment? Remember that dark colours attract more heat so that leaves can make more energy; plants keep leaves all year to get as much sun as there is; shape of plant helps snow fall off; some have bright petals to attract the few insects there are; some have small roots as the soil isn’t very deep.)

Have a look at the list of Endangered animals 1.  Look at one animal and identify the reason why it is endangered (loss of habitat, shortage of food, changing climate, hunting). Sadly, without change the only place we will be able to see these animals is in a zoo.

Consider how you could best write a letter to raise awareness of an animals plight. Endangered animals 2

Weblinks

Endangered mountain animalsfrom worldwildlife.org
The mountain gorilla from animalfactguides.com
More information about the mountain gorilla from nationalgeographic.org

Art

Art ties in nicely with your science work.

Computing

If you can, take a  look at Scratch

Explore some of the tasks to familiarise yourself with how to use the programming software.

Remember, if you want to send any of your work through to  me, I would really like to see it.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton:)

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 6 Home Learning W/C June 29th

Hi,

What a difference in the weather this last week. I hope you have been able to enjoy it and haven’t been suffering from hay-fever.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

There is now a new way of accessing Twinkl materials. You will need to type in a pin number in order to gain access to any materials that have been posted.

PE

I see that Joe Wicks  is only putting out video content a couple of times a week. That’s not a problem, as you can revisit any of the older sessions on his webpage.

Reading

I hope you have had a chance to access Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials. Perhaps you could review something that you have read recently. You could also look at  Twinkl. You’ll find that they are often topical and will be differentiated. Pick the one that is most appropriate for your reading level.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at plural nouns.

  1. dresses
  2. churches
  3. tomatoes
  4. heroes
  5. dominoes
  6. potatoes
  7. thieves
  8. knives
  9. wolves
  10. glasses

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video link

Lesson 1

Lesson 2 – Calculating ratio

Lesson 3 – Using scale factors

Lesson 4 – Ratio and proportion problems

Times Tables

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off from talk4writing but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Science: The circulatory system

This week, I’d like you to:

  • Demonstrate how blood transports nutrients, water, gases and waste around the body.
  • Explore and demonstrate how the circulatory system works including the role of the heart.
  • Use video and online editing tools to create a video installation and a TV advert.

Activities

  1. Explore how the circulatory system works and be able to identify the role blood has within this.
  2. Accurately dramatise the processes of the circulatory system.
  3. Record and edit their dramatisation.

Think about what you have learnt about blood, the heart and how nutrients and water are absorbed and moved around the body. What is the role of the heart in sending oxygen, nutrients and water within the blood around the body? – it pumps blood around the body which carries all of these things around the body.

Humans have a double circulatory system, which means that the heart pumps blood to the lungs and back to get rid of CO2 and to pick up O2 before pumping the oxygenated blood around the body.

Do you remember the 3 types of blood vessel (artery, vein, capillary)? What do you think their role is. The arteries carry blood away from the heart (remember which does which by linking the ‘a’ for arteries with ’a’ for taking blood away from the heart) and the veins carry it back. The capillaries have thinner walls than the arteries and veins and allow nutrients, water and O2 to pass in and out of cells – they join the arteries with the veins. Find out 2 interesting facts about each type of vessel to share with a grown up. Watch the video about the circulatory system as a reminder of how the blood moves to all parts of the body dropping off O2, nutrients and water, and removing waste for expulsion from the body (gases, water, etc.). Can you remember the processes used to move nutrients and water across the capillary walls? (Diffusion/osmosis.) Watch the YouTube video as you are going to create your own drama (a bit like the double circulation one) that may use some of the ideas from this video but that also demonstrates the dropping off of oxygen, nutrients and water and the picking up of waste. Remember that a big healthy heart beats slower than a smaller or weaker heart.

I’d like you to make your own video version of the circulatory system. First, draw out a diagram of the system to show, using colour coding, how various components move around and are removed. They should include, in note form, the processes (e.g. diffusion) that are involved. Then plan and write a script to accompany your dramatic re-enactment. Remember to include waste products.

You could use online video editing software (e.g. www.kizoa.com) to polish and edit your videos.

Vocabulary
Circulatory system, heart, blood, blood vessels, pumps, oxygen, carbon dioxide, lungs, nutrients, water

Weblinks
Blood Circulation – through the Heart and body from www.YouTube.com
GCSE BBC Science Bitesize – Blood Circulation (to 3mins 18) from www.YouTube.com

Topic

This week I’d like you to develop your understanding of climate change and how the mountain environment can be endangered by human activity. Find out about eco-tourism and how it can help protect mountains.

You will:

  • Explain how climate change and global warming impact on the mountain environment.
  • Tell you how tourists pose a threat to the mountain environment.
  • Create a poster that explains how eco-tourism can limit the impact on the environment.

‘Climate’ What words or phrases can you think of when you hear that word.  Remember that the word climate is describing a general pattern of weather at a place.  Describe our climate here in the UK.  How is this different to somewhere like Mount Everest?

Through climate change and global warming our world is starting to warm up and the climates around the world are experiencing changes. Visit the National Geogrpahic link above to watch a short movie on the causes and impacts of global warming and climate change. After watching the video, What might happen because of increased world temperatures? (Mountain glaciers melt, deserts become drier, sea levels rise ‘swallowing’ up land). The people, plants and animals living in these places are all at risk.

So what causes world climate change?

When things burn, CO2 gas is released (Have you heard of it?).  We burn fuel to heat homes, power cars and make electricity. The problem is, we are cutting down trees which would use this CO2 so instead it sits in the atmosphere like a lid keeping all the sun’s heat in!

What about climate change in the Polar Regions? I’m sure you have seen the affects on the news. How is global warming affecting places like this? Can you think of somewhere with a similar climate? (Mountain peaks). The whole mountain environment and its inhabitants are at threat from global warming.

We have looked at human visitors to mountains, but thousands of people visit all sizes of mountains across the world for leisure and holidays.  We know global warming poses a threat to mountains, but What threat could visitors pose to the mountain environment? .

It is estimated that there are 17 tons of rubbish along every 1 km of the Everest Trail alone. Walkers wear away paths, tourists arrive in cars & planes that pollute the environment, hotels are built for the tourists & trees are cut down. Animals are scared or have their homes destroyed!

Look at ‘Ways we damage the environment’ and ‘Eco-Tourism’.

Ways in which we damage the Environment

  • Dropping litter
  • Flying in aeroplanes
  • Building hotels & houses
  • Failing to conserve natural resources
  • Wearing down of paths
  • Damaging natural habitats of animals
  • Over crowding

Eco-tourism

  • Generally speaking, eco-tourism focuses on local cultures, wilderness adventures, volunteering, personal growth and learning new ways to live on the planet.
  • ‘Responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and sustains the well-being of local people’.
  • Increases environmental & cultural knowledge.
  • The main attractions are local culture, flora and fauna.
  • Minimises tourism’s own environmental impact.
  • Promotes affordability and lack of waste in the form of luxury.
  • Take nothing with you and leave nothing but footprints!

I’d like you to make an Ecotourism poster, which should demonstrate how people could still visit mountains but not harm their environment.  You should show a proper understanding of the threats to mountains and how they can be prevented.

Weblinks

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/way-forward-climate?source=relatedvideo  – film about climate change

http://www.ecotourism.org/ – Travel with purpose – a personal purpose and a global one

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecotourism

https://www.explore.co.uk/about-us/responsible-travel – a travel company promoting responsible tourism

Art

Art ties in nicely with your science work.

Computing

If you can, take a  look at Scratch

Explore some of the tasks to familiarise yourself with how to use the programming software.

Remember, if you want to send any of your work through to  me, I would really like to see it.

Keep smiling,

Mr Chiverton:)

Maths answers

Some answers can’t easily be demonstrated. Check with a grown up to see how you have got on.

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Yr 6 Home Learning W/C June 22nd

 

 

Hi,

Hopefully, you have all been able to access the week’s home learning and like the range of tasks provided.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

I hope you are enjoying, and keeping up with your daily Joe Wicks.

Reading

An excellent resource for reading has been provided by Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at plural nouns.

  1. buses
  2. addresses
  3. beaches
  4. activities
  5. families
  6. butterflies
  7. musicians
  8. stories
  9. bodies
  10. scratches

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video links

Lesson 1 – Area and perimeter

Lesson 2 – Area of a triangle (3)

Lesson 3 – Area of a parallelogram

Lesson 4 – Volume of a cuboid

Times tables 

With the times tables, see how many you can complete in 5 minutes. Then, next week, see if you can improve on your score.

Answers at the bottom of the page – no peeking!

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continue to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off, but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Question time!

Where are the dragons heading?

What is ‘paradise’? Why are they looking forward to it so much?

Are these the only 3 dragons that exist, or are there more?

Where have the dragons come from? Where is their home?

If you had a pet baby dragon, how would you look after it?

Sentence challenge!

A simile is a way of describing something by comparing it to something else, often using the word “like” or “as.”

Can you identify all of the similes in my writing?

Can you think of your own similes to use in your writing?

You could experiment using metaphors, or even personification to make your writing really exciting to read!

Story starter!

This was their favourite time of day to fly.

As the glowing, crimson sun dipped down below the vast horizon, retreating to allow night to take its place, the dragons took flight.

The sky looked beautiful: wisps of pillow-like clouds seemed to part in front of them as they flexed their powerful wings. Like sails from ancient ships, the wings beat in the dying embers of the sun’s fire, embracing what little warmth remained. Thousands of tiny scales that covered the beasts’ bodies glistened like rubies in the dazzling light.

As they reached full speed, leaving the world far beneath them, they almost grinned as they thought about where they were going. There would be others like them there. It would be paradise…

I hope you enjoy writing the rest of your story. It would be lovely to see some of them.

Science: Nutrient Detective

Explore the structure and function of the human heart before creating your own heart sculptures. Can you feel the rhythm of your heartbeat? Discover how and why it changes across activity and compare human heartbeats with those of other animals. Create your own sound installation to celebrate the inner rhythm in us all.

  • Know that nutrients and water are transported around the body in the blood.
  • Know that diffusion and osmosis are processes that move nutrient and water in the body.
  • Investigate diffusion and osmosis.
  • Create prints using paints and gelatine and link with diffusion.
  • Create abstract photo montage and link with osmosis.

Activities

  1. Explain how nutrients and water are transported through the body.
  2. Investigate diffusion and osmosis.
  3. Create abstract diffusion art work with accompanying science link explanation.

If possible, for this experiment to be successful, you’ll need some jelly snakes and skittles.

Jelly snake investigation

  1. Measure your jelly snake
  2. Place one snake on a plate with100ml water and leave overnight
  3. Re-measure your snake and compare with the original length

With a plate of multi-coloured Skittles add ~100ml of water to the plate. Observe what happens to the Skittles, then look at and measure the jelly snake (the snakes should have grown). Nutrients come from food and we also need water to function. In your experiments, the colour from the Skittles represents your nutrients, and the water in the snake experiment represents the water in our bodies.

Make suggestions as to what happened in each experiment and how this relates to the movement of nutrients and water within our bodies to help transport it to all our body parts.

Once broken down, the nutrients are absorbed through the walls of our intestines into the blood in a process called diffusion (like in the Skittles experiment) and that water doesn’t need breaking down and moves between membranes in the body to arrive in the correct place, again via our blood through a diffusion process called osmosis. This is true of all animals, not just humans. Osmosis only applies to water (or a solution) and is dependent on a semi-permeable membrane to move from higher concentration to lower concentration, while diffusion is the general movement of molecules or particles from an area of higher concentration to an area of concentration lower (see link).

What else do you think is transported around the body using the process of diffusion (Oxygen, Carbon dioxide, toxins, hormones, etc.).

I would like you to create a piece of art that reflects the processes involved in the journey of our food and water into the blood stream and to the various parts of our body through diffusion and osmosis.

Investigation – exploring, analysing secondary sources
Plotting the journey of water and food.

Vocabulary
Circulatory system, heart, blood, blood vessels, oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, water

Weblinks
Differences between diffusion and osmosis from www.majordifferences.com
Gelatine investigation (scroll down) from http://kitchenpantryscientist.com
Egg investigation from www.schoolingamonkey.com

Topic: Mountains

Research famous mountain explorers, three historic mountain expeditions and their outcomes.

  • Explain why people choose to climb mountains.
  • Research and make notes from a range of sources on an historic mountain expedition.

Settle comfortably in your chairs, close your eyes and feel the weight of your own body. Put your feet flat on the floor and your backs upright, hands can rest gently on your knees. Focus on your breathing- in and out. You feel relaxed and calm. You are now at camp 4 on Mt Everest. Knowing how far you have come, you are excited and anxious as to what lies ahead.  As you leave camp, the winds are strong (play sound effects) and the snow is drifting, making it hard to move.  As you move higher through the biting wind, it becomes harder to breathe as the oxygen levels decrease.  You are gasping for air but frostbite is threatening your fingers and you are unable to change your oxygen tank.  When you look up and see one of the Sherpas coming towards you, you feel relief. Relief that help to get oxygen is here. As you slowly move onwards, walking is like being waist-deep in treacle.  You reach the ridge and move precariously along the ice, exhausted until, just ahead, you see the summit. A sudden surge of energy flows through you – you are going to make it! Emotions pour out of you as you reach the summit.

‘Why do people climb mountains?’  Write down your ideas (They could include: a challenge, to travel, research, the view, to show how they can survive extreme climates, ‘because it’s there’). Would you like to climb a mountain? Why/why not?

Watch the first video (This is a long video but the first 6 mins give a good overview). Would you still like to climb a mountain after watching the video? For hundreds of years, people have been climbing mountains but, as we saw in the video, this can be dangerous and many people have lost their lives. We are going to find out in more detail about a mountain expedition. To do this, I would like you to create a cartoon sequence of a mountaineering expedition. You can use the Mountain expeditions notes to help you.

Weblinks

 

Art

Linked to Science.

Remember, if you want to send me any of your work let me know if it’s okay to put it on the school website. I hope you have a good week.

Keep Smiling,

Mr Chiverton 🙂

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 6 Home Learning W/C June 15th

Hi,

Hopefully, you have all been able to access the week’s home learning and like the range of tasks provided.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at

c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

I hope you are enjoying, and keeping up with your daily Joe Wicks.

Reading

An excellent resource for reading has been provided by Cornerstones. I’ve used them a lot in the past and they provide good reading materials.

Spellings

I hope you managed to practise your spellings from last week. See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words where the words end in –ible and –able.

A little help for you. If you have a root word left when you take away the ending, the chances are quite high that the ending should be –able. However, there are a few exceptions!

  1. uncomfortable
  2. invisible
  3. impossible
  4. terrible
  5. accessible
  6. responsible
  7. considerable
  8. reasonable
  9. understandable
  10. resistible

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video links

Lesson 1 – Solve two-step equations 2019

Lesson 2 – Find pairs of values (2) 2019

Lesson 3 – Convert metric measures 2019

Lesson 4 – Miles and kilometres 2019

Daily Times tables

Answers at the bottom of the page – no peeking!

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continue to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off, but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Question time!

Who/what are these things that are approaching?

Are the people right to be wary?

Do you think the new arrivals mean harm or do they come in peace?

How many of them do you think they are?

Where have they come from?

Who is the character telling the story?

How will people deal with this ‘threat’?

Who controls the airships?

Sentence challenge!

Good writers always try to start sentences in different and interesting ways. Can you write a sentence that begins with a noun?

E.g. The warrior, who was nervous at the site that greeted him, gripped his spear tightly.

A comma always follows the noun, and the sentence contains a relative clause in the middle.

The warrior,

The horse,

A robot,

Story starter!

Many years ago, when I was just a small boy, we found a mysterious object washed up on the beach. It was a sort of silver-grey colour, and looked like a finger, only much, much larger.

My friends and I had huddled together on the beach around the thing, holding our hands up to our faces to shield our eyes from the dazzling sun, talking excitedly about what it could be. Some hours later, after we had all made up wild stories about the origin of our new toy, we dragged the colossal item that was the size of our dining table up to the village.

As we made our way slowly over the sand dunes, and the long, wispy grass that marked the end of the beach and the start of the fields, a crowd seemed to be gathering. Women and young children were leaving their houses, young lads were leaving tools and ploughs unattended in the fields, and rosy-cheeked men were stumbling out of the smoke-filled tavern, all hurrying with increasing urgency towards us.

Over the next days, weeks, months and years, stories were told of how our land was in danger from some kind of threat. There was fretful talk of giants, and frantic warnings about unearthly automatons come to take our lands from us. For years, people had looked over their shoulders, fearful that they were being watched, fearful that something unexpected and terrible was about to occur. For years, unsatisfied farmers had complained about their disappointing harvests, prophesising that the end of the world was near!

Of course, none of us believed them, and none of us thought anything as sinister as the end of the world was just around the corner. But, we did seem to know in our heart of hearts that something was amiss. Something wasn’t quite right…

15 Years later…

I stand on the edge of my lands, grasping my spear firmly in my steady hands. A determined grimace spreads across my face. This is the moment we had all feared. All feared, but never dared to take seriously. Well, now we would have to take it seriously. We would have to take them seriously.

They had arrived…

 

I hope you enjoy writing the rest of your story.

Science: The Art of Being Human – Heart and Circulation

Explore the structure and function of the human heart before creating your own heart sculptures. Can you feel the rhythm of your heartbeat? Discover how and why it changes across activity and compare human heartbeats with those of other animals. Create your own sound installation to celebrate the inner rhythm in us all.

  • Explore the structure and function of the human heart.
  • Investigate and understand that heart size and speed relates to age, fitness and activity and can be improved.
  • Use a range of techniques to try and create an anatomically accurate heart sculpture. ( You could try a range of materials for this. If you have clay or Playdough – great. If not , use your imagination or draw it.)

Activities

  1. Explore the structure and function of the human heart.
  2. Create anatomically correct sculptures of a heart. (This might be a little more difficult if you don’t have sufficient resources)
  3. Investigate and recreate heartrates for varying levels of exertion, giving explanations for observations.

Investigation – observing over time, fair testing, exploring, pattern seeking, analysing secondary sources
Heart rates and physical exertion – a dramatic representation.
Circulatory system sculptures.
Heartbeat sound installation.

Vocabulary
Circulatory system, heart, blood, blood vessels, pumps, oxygen, lungs, nutrients, water, exercise, diet

Weblinks
How does a healthy heart work? from www.bhf.org.uk
The heart and how it works from www.bbc.co.uk
Animation of heartbeat from https://en.wikipedia.org
Animation and 3D echocardiogram of heartbeat) from https://en.wikipedia.org
Heartbeat, Science Museum of Minnesotafrom www.smm.org
Interactive heart from www.pbs.org

Topic: Mountains

Describe and understand key aspects of mountains (physical geography). Use maps and atlases to locate countries and describe features studied.

  • Identify and name some of the main mountains and mountain ranges in the world.
  • Locate mountains and mountain ranges across the world on a map.
  • Explain the difference between mountains and mountain ranges.

There are five different types of mountains and they are all formed in different ways. We are going to find out where there are mountains and mountain ranges (a group or chain of mountains) in the world.   Look back at the table produced in Session 1; what mountains did you come up with?  Have a look at some of the mountains you investigated on Google Earth.

Look at the BBC clip above to get an idea of the height of some of the mountains. Mt Everest in Nepal (Asia) is the highest mountain on earth with K2 being the second highest (also Asia). The Himalayas (Asia) are the highest mountain range in the world (over 24,000ft/7,315m) and the Andes (South America) are the longest (they stretch 4,500miles/7,200km).

Find out what mountains and mountain ranges there are in a continent of your choice and  label these on your map. Then add information onto speech bubbles.  Try and create a world map of mountains and mountain ranges for display.

When you have completed your activity, for more challenge,  order the world’s mountains by height using the major mountain range resource. Can you create a bar chart showing this information to add to your display?

Weblinks

Comparing summits of the world’s mountains to Mount Snowden from bbc.co.uk
List of world’s mountains with a link to live world mountain cameras from primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk
Useful explanation of mountain ranges and examples from primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk
Google Earth

Art

Linked to Science. Create a sculpture or drawing of your heart.

Remember, if you want to send me any of your work let me know if it’s okay to put it on the school website. I hope you have a good week.

Keep Smiling,

Mr Chiverton 🙂

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 6 Home Learning W/C 8th June

Hi,

I hope you have all settled into Summer term and have found plenty to do with the change in weather.

A couple of little changes to this week’s plans. Work your way through the various activities and see how you get on.

Remember, if you have any comments on the work, want to send anything to me or just share work with your classmates then feel free to email me at c.chiverton@shawburystmarys.co.uk

PE

A good way to start the day is with a little Joe Wicks.

Reading

Don’t forget, there are plenty of places to find reading materials online if you are running out of books at home. A really good site, which has celebrities reading chapters, is linked to Harry Potter  

Spellings

See if you can work through the spellings below. At the end of the week see if someone in the family can test you on them.

This week we will be looking at words where the spellings ei and ie.

  1. piece
  2. niece
  3. shriek
  4. relief
  5. believe
  6. ceiling
  7. conceit
  8. receive
  9. deceive
  10. perceive

Maths

I hope you have been enjoying the White Rose Maths. Don’t forget, if you get stuck on any of it, BBC Bitesize is a good place to find help.

Video links

Lesson 1 – Find a rule – two step 2019

Lesson 2 – Forming expressions 2019

Lesson 3 – Substitution 2019

Lesson 4 – Solve simple one-step equations 2019

Answers at the bottom of the page – no peeking!

Literacy

BBC Bitesize continues to have some useful activities that are usually linked to punctuation and grammar. However, some of you might like the chance to do some story writing. There are so many ways you could take your writing that I wouldn’t like to restrict you by saying you have to do it in a particular way. There are a few ideas to start you off, but then it’s up to your fantastic imagination and creativity.

Question time!

Who is the figure in the distance? Do they have anything to do with the disappearance of the street?

Why do you think there is a door in the middle of the road?

Do you think there is anyone living in the houses?

What do you think is underneath the road?

Story starter!

Piece by piece, the street was disappearing.

In the distance a portal shone, sending soft, golden beams of light out across the evening sky. As the light kissed the clouds they blushed, becoming pink illuminations that stood and watched the street below like nosey spectators.

All that was now left of the street was the door. It was still open. There was still time. The figure in the distance began to run, but was he too late?

Think about your sentence structure as you write your story and see what fantastic and imaginative adverbs and adjectives you can use.

Science: The Art of Being Human – Heart and Circulation

Explore the composition of blood and the role it has to play in the human body. Create a painting of blood as seen under a powerful microscope and include a detailed description to accompany it.

  • Identify the components of blood, describe their functions, and note the different blood groups.
  • Note and name the three types of blood vessel.
  • Sketch blood cells, showing texture and form.
  • Select appropriate paint to create a fine art painting of blood cells showing texture and form.

Activities

  1. Identify and describe components of blood and their respective functions, noting the different blood groups.
  2. Sketch and paint magnified blood cells using texture and form.
  3. Be able to name the three types of blood vessel: arteries, veins and capillaries

Vocabulary
Blood, blood vessels, arteries, veins, capillaries, heart, pumps, oxygen, carbon dioxide, lungs, nutrients, water

Topic: Mountains

Describe and understand key aspects of mountains. Learn about the formation of the five different types of mountains by exploring simple models.

  • Identify and name the types of mountains.
  • Understand how mountains are formed.
  • Explain the differences between the formations of the different types of mountains.

We are going to be learning all about mountains and famous expeditions.Write down everything you know about mountains. Look at: names of individual mountains, mountain ranges, what a mountain is, climate, uses of mountains, explorers, key words/vocabulary.  What would you like to find out?

A mountain is something that is part of land, but that rises above everything else (“it is higher and steeper than a hill”). They are very rocky and can join other mountains to form a range. The top of a mountain is called the summit. The bottom is the base. Mountains are formed by slow but gigantic movements of the earth’s crust (the outer layer of the Earth).  The Earth’s crust is made up of 6 huge slabs called plates, which fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. When two slabs of the earth’s crust smash into each other, the land can be pushed upwards forming mountains. Many of the greatest mountain ranges of the world have formed because of enormous collisions between continents. Sometimes the crust has folded and buckled; sometimes it breaks into huge blocks. In both cases, great areas of land are lifted upwards to form mountains. Other mountains are formed by the earth’s crust rising into a dome, or by volcanic activity when the crust cracks open.

Weblinks The 5 types of mountains with examples of each -YouTube clip

Art

Linked to Science. Sketch and paint magnified blood cells using texture and form.

Remember, if you want to send me any of your work let me know if it’s okay to put it on the school website. I hope you have a good week.

Keep Smiling,

Mr Chiverton 🙂

Maths answers

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Year 6 Home Learning March 26th

Good morning. I hope you are all well.

Keep on going with the Education City exercises. The web site have moved to a new server overnight so should now be a little faster.

I can see that some of you are starting a lesson and then either give up on it or achieve a low score. Take your time over it. I’ve taken the timer off to give you more time to look over it.

A few spelling patterns, some more French and some computing to have a go at today.

A little reminder for you all to stay safe. I know it’s really hard in the nice weather to stay away from your friends, but it’s important not to mix and socialise. Don’t be tempted to go round a friends or meet up down the park. We all need to do our part to keep this virus under control.

Keep smiling 🙂

Mr. Chiverton

Year 6 Homework

The children continue to work hard in all aspects of their work.

One area some are finding a little trickier is with fractions. I have produced a guide for the children to help them with solving the problems. If, for whatever reason, they are still finding it difficult to understand then feel free to look up any number of helpful videos online.

This week’s spellings are:

appreciate, average, criticise, curiosity, existence, foreign, immediate, individual, marvellous, prejudice, privilege, pronunciation, restaurant, secretary, sincerely, sufficient, thorough, variety, vegetable, vehicle

 

Mr Chiverton

Year 6 Homework and Spellings

The children in Year 6 continue to have homework that represents aspects of the SATs.

A number of children are either not completing their homework or are leaving a large number of questions unanswered. We are working with the children to develop their resilience. This involves encouraging them to read the question again, decide on what it’s asking and finding the answer from provided material (in the case of reading comprehension) or known methods. If your child is leaving questions unanswered or is making significant errors, please take the time to look over what they have completed and discuss any errors with them.

A few pieces of homework are illegible. Please support your child in providing a suitable environment for them to complete their work. If this proves too difficult, the children have the opportunity to have a look at their homework on a Wednesday lunchtime.

This week’s spellings are from the Year 3/4 curriculum list.

Actual, answer, believe, calendar, caught, circle, different, eighth, February, heard, increase, knowledge, library, occasion, particular, probably, purpose, quarter, separate, weight

Thanks again for your continued support.

Mr. Chiverton

Year 6 Homework

The children are continuing to work hard to wards their SATs this May. Could I encourage them to talk through their homework with you and for you to check it with them after they have finished. The children are also making errors with accuracy. Some of the questions involving line graphs had errors that could have been avoided it the children completed the task with a ruler and sat at a table.

I have attached a PDF of the presentation I gave to parents this week. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions linked to it.

SATs Presentation for Parents 2020

Spellings for this week are from the Year 3/4 spelling list

accident, actually, breathe, build, business, centre, continue, consider, experience, extreme, forwards, grammar, material, medicine, naughty, occasionally, opposite, preference, regular, strength

Year 6 Homework

Homework this week will continue with maths and reading practise. The children have also been given the two spelling lists that they should all know by the end of year 6. All the spelling patterns and words have been taught over the past four years. As the children are finding this quite daunting, I have selected twenty for them to concentrate on.

A number of children are rushing through their reading comprehension papers and are making significant errors. Please encourage your child to talk to you about their answers once they have completed their questions so that you can go over any areas  they have had difficulty with.

On Wednesday 12th February at 2:30 I will be holding a meeting for parents to pass on information about Sats. I hope to see you there.

 

Mr Chiverton